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Creative HD7600 HD Laser
 

Regardless of if you play RTS or FPS you're going to encounter the same problem while in the heat of battle. Your enemy appears, and you jerk your hand to engage the enemy, but your cursor just won't move fast enough. Today we look at Creative's latest mouse, the HD7600 HD Laser mouse, which hopes to solve this dilemma.


http://reviewstash.com/imgupload/2_hd7600.pngPrice Tag: $49.99
Website: Frys.com

Creative’s Claim

High-tech Teflon ensures ultra-smooth mouse action for ultra-fast moves.
Advanced HD-Lazer technology for greater accuracy and control.

The Stash’s Findings

The Creative HD Laser Mouse has your basic left and right buttons but also come equipped with two thumb buttons located on the upper left ridge of the mouse. These buttons are easily accessed and when web browsing serve as page back and page forward buttons. The mouse also has a scroll wheel, and just below that the very useful DPI (sensitivity) adjuster. The adjuster consists of a switch that changes your DPI. Just below that is a visual indication of the current DPI, showing 400, 800, 1600, and even 2400.

The mouse is built very sturdy and has a good weight to it. It’s not too heavy nor too light, the curvature of the mouse fits well into the palm of your hand. There is plenty of room even for the biggest of hands to fit comfortably on this mouse. If you hold your mouse by your fingers, you might want to avoid this mouse. 

This mouse is strictly right handed, on the left flank the side buttons flare out to help your rest your thumb making it un-usable for lefties. The however primary mouse buttons have a very “grippy” feel to them making them very comfortable to use

You won’t have any trouble finding the scroll wheel in the dark on this baby, that’s because it’s lit up by an LED. As previously mentioned there are four separate lights below the scroll wheel indicating the DPI level the mouse is set to, all of which are blue. Included with the mouse are three different interchangeable colored palm rests; red, pearlescent green, and pearlescent purple.
       
The Verdict

If you’re a gamer looking for that extra edge on the competition this baby does the job. It’s perfect for all gaming situations; when sniping you can reach your finger over and quickly change the DPI to give you that extra edge. Once you get past the ridiculously long name, “gold plating” gimmick, and the design, you’re left with a comfortable gaming mouse that might just help improve your frag.   

Pros:
Comfortable (For palm users)
Changeable covers
Teflon

Cons:
Cost 49.99 may be a bit hefty for the average gamer’s budget
You won’t be able to use your mouse as an excuse for your sorry skills
Neutral:
You might not like the flashy LEDs and gaudy design

 
D-Link DIR-625
 

http://reviewstash.com/imgupload/2_dlinkdir625.png
Let’s face it, going to an electronic store shopping for the best home or office router can be difficult especially for a new user. Today RVS looks at D-Links new DIR625 Range Booster router with Wireless N.

D-Link’s Claim:

The promised standard of Wireless N is designed to eventually offer speeds up to 600Mbps with average data transfer rates around 200Mbps and ranges extending up to 200 Feet indoors. This draft version of D- Link routers promise speeds up to 300mbps with data transfer rates reaching 130 Mbps and indoor distances up to 150 feet.
       
The Stash’s Findings:

Setup was quick and easy, simple enough for anyone. Installation was as easy as opening a box and popping in a CD.

The Test:

We conducted three tests to see the maximum range and speed you'll get in practical situations. Our first test showed that within a clear 10 foot distance you'll see excellent performance with no dropped signals. At 50 feet with a wall through the signal, we still get a very good or excellent connection. However, at 150 feet we see the router show its technical limit. With three walls and a distance of 150 feet, we saw numerous dropped signals with very low speeds. Taking the walls into account, you can expect about 80-100 feet with interference, and 100-150 feet without.

The Verdict:

If you’re looking to enter the “wild west” of networking, D-Link’s DIR-625 might just be what you need to help you. If you’re looking for stability, then you might want to look else where. Wireless N still has a lot of growing up to do.

Pros:
Clean Styling
Easy to setup
Much more mature than previous N technologies

Cons:
Heating problems
Stability
Price tag

 
Motorola V3XX
 

http://reviewstash.com/imgupload/2_v3xx.pngToday we're going to look at AT&T Wireless' latest phone, the Motorola V3XX, It’s thin, light and comes in a vibrant colors. The handset includes features like a 1.3 mega pixel camera and a media player with support for MP3, WMA, AAC, RealAudio and streaming audio. Included also are A2DP and microSD.

Price Tag: $349.99 or FREE with 2 year contract.

The Stash's Findings

DESIGN There is a mysterious, glossy black rectangle on the hinge facing the user where customers in other countries get a front-facing camera for video conferencing, but not here in the U.S unfortunately. The screen is the best we have seen on a RAZR by far: a 2.2-inch, 262,000-color, QVGA display that looks crisp browsing pictures and especially when viewing text. The interface is similar to older RAZRs, even dating back to the original RAZR V3 interface, but looks more polished, with better looking fonts, nice color gradients and smooth animations on icons and progress bars.

Calling The RAZR V3xx makes calls that sound clean and clear, with no static or digital distortion. Calls were dropped a one time on AT&T network in Sacramento California, but we ran our tests in Los Angeles without incident. Reception was strong; we typically full reception. In Reno, without 3G reception, we got just under 4 hours of talk time, though AT&T admits that 3G shortens the battery life slightly, even when you are not using the data capabilities. The phone has a wealth of calling options, including speaker-independent voice dialing, Bluetooth, and a speakerphone. Three-way calling required some light menu drilling, but was no problem to connect. The address book was comprehensive for a non-smart phone, with fields for e-mail, postal address, URL and unique ringer IDs. The contact list also supports live, while-you-type searching. Internet browsing on the 2.2-inch QVGA screen is a bit of a mixed bag. Though it's plenty bright, the scroll function on the built-in browser is too slow and the vertical orientation of the screen means it's good only for blogs and not standard horizontal sites but overall speeds overall is fantastic in most U.S major cities.

Media The V3xx's MP3 player also got a very necessary update. You can now search, sort, and view by album, artist, or title. In addition, you can upload MP3 or M4A files with bit rates of up to 256 kilobits per second to the phone at fast USB 2.0 speeds—about two seconds per song—using a standard mini-USB cable that you probably have lying around anyway. You can also transfer files over Bluetooth. Songs are stored on a microSD card under the back cover, though, thankfully, you don't have to remove the battery to get at it.

Verdict, Pros / Cons

If you’re a gamer looking for that extra edge on the competition this baby does the job. It’s perfect for all gaming situations; when sniping you can reach your finger over and quickly change the DPI to give you that extra edge. Once you get past the ridiculously long name, “gold plating” gimmick, and the design, you’re left with a comfortable gaming mouse that might just help improve your frag.

Pros:

Sexy slim look. Excellent reception and call quality.

Cons:

Poor Camera quality. The Motorola Razr V3xx isn't a quadband world phone.

 
25%-off ThinkPads at Lenovo
 

http://www.blogsmithmedia.com/www.engadget.com/media/2007/12/thinkpad-25percent.jpg
"We're not sure why Lenovo is feeling so particularly jolly this holiday season, but we're certainly not complaining. The company just slashed prices on its ThinkPad R, T and X series laptops, and its ThinkCentre A desktops. All models have received a 25% price cut, except for the R series with a still-lovable 22%. Yeah, you know the person on your list with everything? We bet they don't have seven ThinkPads courtesy of their new favorite nephew."

Lenovo

 

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